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Monterosso al Mare View

Fragrance of lemon blossoms, the taste of salt-tainted breezes and the wash of persistent sea greet me when I descended to Monterosso al Mare, the northernmost village on the Cinque Terre.

Lane, Monterosso al Mare

This is the largest of the five villages and I find that what the local’s refer to as Old Town and New Town are not substantially different. As I walked through the tunnel which now links the two areas of town, the arc of a sandy beach stretches before me from the breakwater to the small peninsula which juts into the sea on the southern end of the village.

Unlike the other towns along this stretch of coastline, Monterosso is easily reached by car. From the A12 autostrada that connects Pisa with Genoa, and beyond, there are well-marked exits that will lead you to the largest of the villages on the coast.

Please read the “IF YOU GO” section below regarding driving to Monterosso as well as parking challenges near the village.

Historically, the story of Monterosso is not dissimilar to those of the other Cinque Terre Village. Genoa subjugated the residents along the stretch of sea for centuries.

Long on the Italian summer holiday list of popular places to get to the sea, the narrow streets and beaches are always busy in the ‘high season’.

Monterosso Umbrellas

It seemed appropriate that my articles about the Cinque Terre would end in town with two huge statues.

In 1910 the sculptor, Arrigo Minerbi of Ferrara created a nearly 45 foot tall statue of Neptune, complete with Trident and Nautilus. As a result of  bombings during World War II, the “Gigante” was heavily damaged. Still, it stands at the southern limit of the beach, looking over the sea from whence he came.

Neptune of Monterosso

In 1962, Silvio Monfrini, a sculptor who was born in Milan, created a large bronze statue of St. Francis petting a dog. The statue occupies a gorgeous terrace high above the village near the Conventi del Cappuccine. While the steep stairs may tax your muscles, the view from the terrace is breathtaking. Well worth the effort!

Statue of Saint Francis above Monterosso al Mare

As I departed the village on my way north to Genoa, those two statues haunted me. Neptune, who no longer holds his Trident nor Nautilus, hunches armless over the cerulean blue Mediterranean. The five villages that cling to the shores of the Cinque Terre were for many decades falling in to disrepair, nearly forgotten save for the thousands of tourists who descended before and after the war.

Monfrini’s 20th Century work stands high above the village, an ever present reminder of the role of faith and church in the lives of the men and women who have, for centuries, survived on the richness of soil and sea.

The villagers have created bountiful lives through the gifts of faith, sea and soil. Statues may suffer, even disappear, yet the beauty of this precipitous coastline remains to be enjoyed and shared by visitors in years to come.

IF YOU GO:

Driving to Monterosso al Mare:

From the A12 Autostrada, heading either north of south, the exits for Monterosso al Mare are well marked. Follow the signs toward Levanto and, from there, to Monterosso. The road between the Autostrada and the village is treacherous and narrow, so I advise extreme caution especially if you are driving a large rental car or van. Parking in the village is challenging. There are a few public garages, most notable above the ‘new town” , where you enter the village.

Some hotels offer temporary parking for registration and/or departure. Do NOT park if  you are not sure you are allowed to. The local police do ticket and, believe it or not, the tickets always catch up with you.

Diversions:

Angelo’s Boat Tours

My first experience with Angelo and his lovely wife, Paula, a few years ago. Clients I was traveling with were just leaving the port on Angelo’s boat and Paula invited me up to her incredible hillside garden where, from time to time, she leads small group cooking classes. The roses, the oleander, the lemons all conspired to make me want to sit and never leave.

The tours are available through pre-booking on their web site – see below. For information on Paul’s cooking classes, you can contact her directly, via email, on angelosboattours@yahoo.com.

Angelo’s Boat Tours, Monterosso

These are incredible journey’s along the coast and I highly recommend, as part of your visit to the Cinque Terre, to enjoy one of their unforgettable boat tours.

Hotels Monterosso al Mare

A brief word about the Hotel Porta Roca. This would be the splurge of your time on the coast – but the views from the sea-facing rooms, the level of service and the comfort are simply unmatched in any other hotel on the Cinque Terre. This is one gorgeous hotel!

Hotel Porta Roca 

Località Corone, 1  19016 Monterosso Al Mare

Province of La Spezia, Italy

Tel: +39.0187.817.502

Hotel Pasquale 

Via Fegina, 4  19016 Monterosso Al Mare Province of La Spezia, Italy

Tel: +39.0187.817.477

Hotel Villa Steno   http://www.villasteno.com/

Via Roma, 109  19016 Monterosso Al Mare Province of La Spezia, Italy

Tel: +39.0187.817.028

Restaurants Monterosso al Mare

Given the size of the village of Monterosso, your options are varied and numerous. These are only a few where the food and fair pricing have brought me back numerous times. Enjoy!

Ristorante Miky (web site, as of this writing, not linking)

Via Fegina, 104  19016 Monterosso Al Mare Province of La Spezia, Italy

Tel: +39.0187.817.608

Ristorante L’Alta Marea (no Web Site)

Via Roma, 54  Monterosso al Mare, Province of La Spezia, Italy

TeL: +39.0187.817.331

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I came to Riomaggiore late in my Italian travel life. It was in 2001 during an extended residency in Florence to write my first book, Tuscan Echoes A Season in Italy, that I took a three day/night trip to the Cinque Terre.

When I stepped off the train from La Spezia and walked through the town to the sea, the beauty of this area of Italy completely overwhelmed me. Fishing boats rested on cobble stoned streets, narrow lanes enticed with their cooling shadows, and always there murmured the sound of the persistent sea as it encountered the breakwater of the harbor. From my room in a small, centrally located, B&B below for If You Go), I enjoyed easy access to the streets of the village as well as the trails that crisscross the hillsides above.

Inhabitants of Riomaggiore can be traced to the 8th Century AD. Those early settlers from a nearby valley discovered the rich volcanic soil in the hills along the coast and the abundant fishing. Vineyards were planted and families created lives from the sea’s bounty. Over the centuries, the political feuds that embroiled most of Italy also brought change to Riomaggiore and the coastal villages. Genoa, Milan and Pisa all vied for control of these easily defensible hills.

What brings visitors today is the ineffable beauty of the place. In 1999, the Italian Government designated the five lands, the Cinque Terre, a National Park (Parco Nazionale delle Cinque Terre). With the goal of protecting both the sea and land along this stretch of coastline. The parks’ designation also protects the area from further development.

What I most enjoy when visiting this area of Italy is the narrow lanes of the town. When strolling along the Via Antonio Gramsci as it precipitously descends to the sea, or along the Via San Giacomo on the harbor, I gain a sense of uncluttered and unchanged time. There is a special spirit and a special group of locals who make the Cinque Terre a place where unforgettable memories are created.

The Via Dell’Amore

The “Street of Love”. What more appropriate name could this stretch of the pathway between Riomaggiore and Monterosso have? Relatively flat and easy to walk, this is the most traveled section of the hiking trails that connect all five of the fishing villages along the Cinque Terre. From sculptures that portray vision of love to the padlocks of lovers who close their personalized lock on a fishing net then fling the key into the sea, this is a beautiful section of the coast.

Via Dell’Amore along the Cinque Terre

If you are on the coast during the summer months, expect this particular section of the hiking trail to be very crowded. Also, make sure you purchase a Cinque Terre Card, your paid access ticket to the hiking paths of the Cinque Terre. See “If You Go” below for most details.

IF YOU GO:

This area of Italy has become very crowded during the summer months. Standing room only on the trains, packed restaurants especially during lunch, full hotels and hoards of tourists are the norm, June – mid-September. If you plan to visit and wish to enjoy a more peaceful time, I recommend visiting from late April to late May and from early to late October. The weather during these ‘off-seasons’ can be a bit unpredictable, the lack of crowds make it worth the effort.

Trains:

You can purchase a Cinque Terre Train pass at numerous locations in each village as well as in the train station of La Spezia. The cost of the weekday card is Euro 5.00 and the weekend card is Euro 12.00. If you purchase the Cinque Terre Train pass you can use that ticket for access ONLY to the Blue Trail, #2.

Hiking:

The entire section of coastline in crisscrossed with many hiking trails, varying in difficulty from beginner to extreme. Maps of these various trails, and information regarding access to them, are available in train station and tourist information sites throughout the area.

For a great place to start exploring options related to hiking in the area, visit: Hiking Cinque Terre

You can purchase a Cinque Terre Basic Ticket at numerous locations in each village as well as at train station. While this card does not include use of the trains that travel along the coast, you still have access to the Blue Trail, #2 as well as other services along the coast.

For either of these tickets, begin at:

Cinqueterre.com

Hotels Riomaggiore

As is true with all of the villages along the coast, you are strongly encouraged to book your hotel rooms(s) well in advance of your travel dates. If you visiting during late October – late March, then you will find accommodations available for ‘last minute’ arrivals. Regardless, reserve in advance and you will have one less worry for your trip.

La Scogliera

Salita Castello, 174 Riomaggiore 19017 (SP) Italy

+39 3346194505

This hotel prefers that requests be sent via email to: la_scogliera@alice.it

Luna di Marzo

Via Montello 387, Volastra Riomaggiore  19017 Riomaggiore, Italy

+39 0187 920530

Affittacamere Edi 

Via Colombo, 111  19017 Riomaggiore Province of La Spezia, Italy

+39 0187 920325

Restaurants Riomaggiore

During high season, you should reserve for dinner in most places in Riomaggiore. The restaurants are, in general, very small and fill quickly for the evening meal.

Trattoria “Via dell’Amore” di Rosa Rafaella

19017 Riomaggiore (SP) – Piazza Rio Finale, 8

Tel: +39.0187.920.860

web: http://www.trovalaspezia.info/trattoriaviadellamore.htm

Il Grottino

Via Colombo  Riomaggiore, Province of La Spezia, Italy

Tel: +39.0187.920.938

Cappun Magru in Casa di Marin

Via Volastra 1, RIOMAGGIORE 19017

Tel: +39.0187.920.563

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Cinque Terre Sunset from the High Road

As sunset settles upon the Cinque Terre, the sky becomes a curtain of gold, the sea an undulating sapphire veil.

This is a place of poetry.

Visually stunning, breathtaking in its scope, musical in its winds, poetic to the soul. Cinque Terre, the Five Lands, have long captured the imaginations of artists and travelers alike.

In his poem about a Sunday morning in a village along the coast, Edoardo Firpo captures all that is magical about the coast and villages in his Cinque Terre.

The slope rises rapidly
in the shadow of the houses;
amid the eaves and gutters
appears a limpid sky…

The mule clambers up the hill
in the tinkle of harness bells;
two or three jingling together
make a slow melody
but one with a lower tone
gives a ring every now and then.

The hens scamper down and peck
at pebbles along the ground.

Today is Sunday, and
all of the women stand
before their half-open doors,
all dressed in black because
of vespers still to come.

Withered by years and sun
they chat softly now and then,
saying things already said upon those ancient steps.

Sometimes there comes the hum
from behind the quiet houses
of the young ones in the sun.

Today’s the first day of autumn
and the heat of summer lingers;
the grapes are still on the vine
and not one cloud in the sky.

And I who am passing by
pause on the height, all alone,
in the midst of the sunny vines
close by the silvery veins
that warble as they run down
to lose themselves in the sea.

Edoardo Firpo – Cinque Terre

Along this stretch of Ligurian coastline (the Cinque Terre is within the political boundaries of the Province of Liguria) is a photographers and romantics playground. From the early morning mists that wrap the cliffs above the sea, to the long rays of sunset that shimmer the surface of the sea, the views are ever changing, the memories imparted unforgettable.

In my next five posts, I will focus on each of the villages that encompass the Cinque Terre with information about hotels and restaurants, along with recommendations for a day’s visit in each.

The area now known as the Five Lands encompass a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1998 and 1999, the Italian Government passed legislation to protect the natural environment and to further encourage ecological balance in the water and on the land.

Hiking trails, in all manner of upkeep, crisscross the land. From paved walkways suspended above the sea to rough steep gravel pathways, there is something for everyone who wishes to experience fresh air and views above and along the coast.

IF YOU GO:

Most visitors arrive by train. Between Genoa and Pisa, and easily reached from Florence, this is truly the preferred way to arrive. For those with cars, you might consider parking at the lot at the train station in La Spezia and taking the train from there. Driving into the villages is impossible for some of them. Monterosso al Mare, on the northern end of the Cinque Terre is the most easily reached by car, and that proves difficult with very narrow roads and precipitous drops to the sea. Parking can also be a challenge even in Monterosso, often requiring a good 1/4 mile descent (and ascent!) to walk from the garage or road side parking to the village.

Train passes for travel between all five villages are available at the train station in La Spezia, and in each village’s train station. Here are prices and information about the passes. For most current information, visit: Cinque Terre Train Passes

  • One day, adults: 10 euro
  • Two day, adults: 19 euro
  • Children under 12: 6 euro
  • Over age 70: 8 euro
  • Family Card (2 adults and 2 under 12): 26 euro

For those of you not familiar with ticket validation, you will need to locate a yellow box in the station before you leave, place the ticket in the slot and print a validation stamp on your ticket. Failure to do so will result, if you are asked to produce a non-validated ticket, of a fine from the conductor.

For summer excursions along the coast, click on this link: Gulf of Poets Cinque Terre

Hotels:

This is one of the most popular places to visit in Italy. If you arrive with no hotel reservation, you will probably discover how busy it is! I recommend reserving at least sixty days in advance of your visit. It is always possible to find last-minute accommodations in one of the villages, yet it is always best to book early.

In the next five posts on our blog, I include details about hotels and B&B’s in each of the five villages along the coast.

Hiking Map:

Map, Cinque Terre

This map provides general orientation to the Cinque Terre. For those interested in hiking the trails in the park, or along the coast, maps and detailed information are available at hotels, train stations and at Tourist Information offices in each village. Please note that you should wear very comfortable walking shoes or boots if you intend to attempt any of the trails and walkways in the area.

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When you have had the opportunity to explore and experience Pisa, I recommend heading to the sea.

Marina di Pisa Panorama

The Arno River, which divides the city of Pisa, empties into the Mediterranean Sea at the small village of Marina di Pisa. You follow signs out of the city for Marina to Pisa, Mare (the sea) or Tirrenia and you will find yourself driving along the final kilometers of the Arno.

Sycamore trees shade the entire distance of the Lungarno Gabrielle D’Annuzzio, the road that traces the south side of the river between Pisa and the sea. These trees have lined this narrow road since I was a child. My father often drove our family on this same road to visit our landlord and his family in Pisa or to head further on to Pontadera and Florence. In the days before the superhighway that now connects Pisa and Florence, this was one of the main roads connecting those cities.

On fall days, when the leaves scatter across the road and a golden curtain of season’s ending  fill the air, the memories of my early years in Italy are particularly clear.

Marina di Pisa

As you enter Marina di Pisa (about ten minutes from the outskirts of Pisa) you will see a parking area and some old fishing stalls on your right.

Pull over, park, get out of the car and walk to the water. Large alabaster stones cut from nearby quarries (including Carrara-the quarry made

Fishing Hut – Marina di Pisa

famous by Michelangelo) line the bank of the river. As you look north, you will see some fishing huts on stilts, their nets hung from large poles above the water.

On clear days from this quiet parking area you can see north up the coast toward the Cinque Terre (the Five Lands). The long arc of the coastline invites further exploration and the desire to walk along the sea (read on) strengthens.

The town of Marina is Pisa is a very small and unassuming place. One main road leads you through the town to a sharp curve to the south. It is from the city front park you can see south along the coast to the port city of Livorno. If you have time, I recommend leaving the main road and exploring the side streets of the town.

Laundry hangs from balconies, a few dogs amble down dusty, quiet streets and a few locals peer inquiringly from their front doors. This is a place that seems straight from a 1950’s Italian film; only during the months of July and August is it filled with daily or seasonal visitors who desire the sun and sea. During the other months of the year, the town folds up on itself and just exists as do so many village across Italy.

Many excellent seafood restaurants line the ‘beach’ as you head south along the coast. I use the word beach a bit loosely , as visitors literally lay out on huge boulders brought in to protect the sea front. There are stretches of level beach, yet even those are stone. If you plan to spend time getting some sun and sea, bring thick towels and plenty of padding!

Tirrenia, Beach View

Our family was fortunate to live in this small village during my father’s military assignment at the port of Livorno. My brother and I attended the school at US Military Base at Camp Darby. We shopped in the stores, ate in many of the restaurants and actually stayed in a hotel along the main road when we first arrived.

There are plenty of ‘private beach clubs’ along the road as you drive into Tirrenia. You are welcome to approach any of them if you desire a more private beach experience; be aware, however, that these places all charge fees since they provide a place to change clothes, umbrellas and beach chairs.

The town is becoming more popular for the summer season visitor. Private villas abound on the eastern side of the main road, and a short trip to view some of them is well worth the time.

You can continue on the road that parallels the beach all the way to the port city of Livorno. My next blog will be all about that interesting city.

Via del Terreno
Marina di Pisa

IF YOU GO:

The closest cities, to use the train system, are Pisa or Livorno. Both have regular service to Florence. From either train station you can take a bus, or if you prefer you can take a taxi. Negotiate the rate with the driver before you leave the station and before you get in the taxi!

Average fares between Livorno Centrale and these villages is Euro 40 each direction. Between Pisa Centrale Station and the villages, Euro 45 each direction.

Marina di Pisa

Restaurants:

Oltremare

Via Repubblica Pisana, 7/8

Oltremare, Marina di Pisa

Marina di Pisa, (PI) Italy

Tel: 050.353.86 or cell number +39.393.788.4775

I’ve eaten here a few times. A VERY informal place with exceptional seafood. Often crowded, so I go either early for dinner. The latter you go, the busier this place is during season. Call ahead to make sure that the restaurant is open if you want to eat here off season, especially November through April.

Ristorante da Gino

Via Curzolari,2
56128 Marina di Pisa (PI)

Tel: 050.354.08

I’ve eaten here twice. It is a pretty pricey place, but in exchange for the prices you get one heck of a meal. This is Tripadvisors #1 rated restaurant in Marina di Pisa. Make reservations for certain – and you will enjoy a great meal.

Hotels in Marina di Pisa

You are only twelve to fifteen minutes from the center of Pisa from this village. If you wish to find very inexpensive accommodations along the sea while exploring the city of Pisa, Marina di Pisa offers some alternatives for you to consider.

Do not expect luxury AT ALL in this small village. These two hotels offer acceptable accommodations, but please – again – do not expect big city comforts. This is a small fishing/seaside village, after all! Please use the links below to go directly to the property’s web site.

Hotel Manzi, Marina di Pisa

Hotel Manzi (Three Star)

The place offers the simplest possible accommodations, while keeping clean and safe. Run by an amicable Marina di Pisa family.

Hotel Manzi

Via Repubblica Pisana (Lungomare) , 25

56013 Marina di Pisa (Pisa) Italy

Tel:

Hotel Boboba Il Villaggio (Three Star)

This place is like Disney World on Italian steroids. Water park, close to beach, huge pool. Accommodations are mostly apartment like spaces. Clean and safe.

Hotel Boboba Il Villaggio

Via Litoranea 7, 56013 Marina di Pisa, Pisa, Italy

A bit more upscale than the Manzi.

Tirrenia

Restaurants

Ristorante Martini

This family owned restaurant, in the same family for generations, offers up flavorful fresh seafood at modest prices. In high season, I recommend

Ristorante Martini, Interior, Tirrenia

reservations in advance. Season in Tirrenia runs from mid June to early September.

Ristorante Martini

Via dell’Edera, 16 Tirrenia

56018 – (PI) Italy

Tel: +39.05.0 37.592

Ristorante lo Squalo

Located just off the south side of the main traffic circle, this unassuming place is near a gas station, of all things. Don’t be fooled by all of that. Specialties include shark (Squalo) and other fresh and beautifully prepared seafood.

Ristorante lo Squalo (No Web Site)

Via delle Rose, 1

56128 Tirrenia (PI), Italy

Tel: +39.050.373.05

Hotels

Grand Hotel Continental

Grand Hotel Continental, Tirrenia

As it name implies, this is a large, convention style hotel located directly on the beach. Close to the main traffic circle in town, it has a loggia full of shops – everything from magazines to gelato. Large private beach areas are reserved for guests, complete with umbrellas and beach chairs. Room rates average Euro 110.00 per room per night.

Grand Hotel Continental

Largo Belvedere, 26

56128 Tirrenia (PI)  – Italy

Tel: +39.050.37031

EuroHotel Tirrenia

Located very close to the main traffic circle in Tirrenia, this is an old stand-by. Do not expect fancy or a lot of frills, but the location and cleanliness of the rooms – added to the rates which are between Euro 36.00 for a single to Euro 67.00 for a large double – make it a very attractive choice.

Eurohotel, Tirrenia

V.le del Tirreno 217 Tirrenia

Tel: +39.05.033.028

Hotel Florida, Tirrenia

Located about 300 meters  from the main traffic circle, this lovely small hotel offers very affordable rates, between Euro 40.00 and Euro 60.00 per room per night, with very good service. Guests can access many of the private beach clubs (remember, you can enter – just pay for the day and you can use the facilities) easily from the hotel.

Hotel Florida, Tirrenia

Viale del Tirreno 227

56128 Tirrenia – Pisa, Italy
Tel:  +39.05.037.236

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Charterhouse of Pisa
Calci, Tuscany, Italy

Few tourists know of the road that connects Lucca with the small village of Calci. Nor do many visitors know of the monumental surprise that awaits them – the Charterhouse of Pisa.

My recommendation is to not take the A-11 autostrada from Lucca to Pisa. Rather, as you arrive at the Lucca Ovest (West) interchange follow signs to the SS-12 (Strada Statale-State Road) toward San Giuliano Terme.

As you drive toward San Giuliano Terme, you will pass through the village of Santa Maria del Giudici then enter a tunnel. After you leave the tunnel and drive into San Giuliano Terme, watch for a turn to the left ttoward the town of Calci. Once you are on the road to Calci, the signs directing you to the Certosa (Charterhouse) of Pisa make the rest of the trip very easy.

Why go?

Charterhouse of Pisa
(Monumentale Certosa di Calci)
Tuscany, Italy

This is an enormous complex of buildings, many of them restored after World War II. The remote and beautiful setting, once referred to as the “Valle Graziosa” or “Pretty Valley,” allows visitors the opportunity to enjoy a visit to a beautiful church without the crowds that are found below in the city of Pisa proper. Though the charterhouse is located only about six miles from Pisa, you may as well be a hundred miles from such a large population center.

History

It was in 1366 that Carthusian Monks established their hermitage near Calci. The Carthusian order derives its name from the location of the first heritage established by Saint Bruno. The Chartreuse Mountains, located east southeast of the French city of Lyon is where Bruno began his religious life.

Gorgona, a small island located about twenty miles off the port of Livorno, is part of the Tuscan Archipelago. (On very clear days,you can see the island from a few of the small seaside villages north of Livorno – Tirrenia and Marina di Pisa). In 1369, Pope Gregory XI expelled a group of Benedictine monks  from the island. Some of the monks from Calci were sent to repopulate the island, even as their population grew at the Charterhouse. In the mid-15th Century, due to threats of possible attack by Saracens, the monks on the island brought all of their valuable documents to the Charterhouse.

Cloister, Charterhouse of Pisa

The current architectural style of the buildings is owed to Baroque work of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

After Napoleon’s suppression of religious orders, in 1808, the Carthusian order at Calci was forced to disband. The majority of the monks moved to the Vallombrosian Monastery in Pisa. Most of the silver and gold pieces collected from the religious community were sent to Florence to be melted and used for other purposes. Contents of the library, records, archives and many valuable paintings were sold.

In 1814 when the Grand Dukes of Lorraine permitted the return of the order the Charterhouse, their financial support assisted in the purchase of items that had previously been sold.

A few years after the unification of Italy, in 1866, the government decreed that all works of art, the library and other important documents were to be removed. The buildings and land, then, were assigned to the new Ministry of Education.

From 1946 until 1963, a group of Carthusian monks from the Netherlands attempted to establish a group of monks at the Charterhouse, with the hope of reestablishing their order in their home country. Their efforts yielded no success. When the last of the two Carthusian monks were moved from the monastery in 1972, the state took over responsibility for the maintenance and care of the buildings.

In 1981  the Natural History Museum of the University of Pisa was moved into one wing of the Charterhouse. The collections, started in the mid-16th Century, primarily include paleontological and mineral specimens collected over the centuries.

Choir Stalls, Charterhouse of Pisa

Interior

The major construction work on the buildings occurred after the monks returned from the Island of Gorgona (1425) and during the 17th and 18th Century. Monk’s cells, the main chapel and other parts of the building, to include a natural pharmacy based upon the research of herbs grown in the Charterhouse’s “Giardino dei Semplici,” were completed in the early part of the 16th Century. The garden, similar in purpose to one established in 1545 by Grand Duck Cosimo di Medici in Florence, was intended to investigate and research plants that might be used for the cure of disease and infection.

The interior of the church contains some of the finest hand carved choir stalls in Italy. Giovan Francesco Bergamini began, and his son Alessandro (1665-1686) completed, work on a beautiful altar made from Carrara marble. One of the few remaining original works is one of San Bruno (founder of the Carthusean order)

Baldasarre Franceschini (Il Volterrano)

offering the Charterhouse to Our Lady (1681) by Baldassarre Franceschini, called Il Volterrano. An interesting note about the work is that San Bruno holds a model of the Monastery as it appeared before Baroque era changes.

This is an incredibly beautiful building, little known by the millions of tourists who flock to a certain tower in the city of Pisa. If you are in Lucca, or Pisa, and seek the opportunity to explore an historic and beautifully preserved site, visit the Charterhouse of Pisa.

IF YOU GO:

Here are some on-line resources for your information before a visit.

Charterhouse of Pisa

Opening Times
• Tuesday to Saturday: from 8.30am to 6.30pm
• Sundays and public holidays: from 8.30am to 12.30pm
• Closed Mondays and 1/1, 1/5 and 25/12.

Admission
• Full Euro 5.00
• For 18 to 25 year old visitors Euro 2.50

Natural history Museum of the University of Pisa

NOTE: This is a very popular place for school visits, so you may be a bit surprised to see so many children crowded at the entrance to the Charterhouse. Those groups usually only visit the Museum and do not enter the main religious structures for a tour.

Information about the collections

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