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Archive for the ‘Museums and Galleries in Italy’ Category

Here is some great news about the Uffizi in Florence.

For those who have visited the gallery, you may recall the Sandro Botticelli rooms located off of the Eastern/First Corridor in numbers 10 – 14. (See map below) They were rather dark, crowded (always) and not easy to navigate.

Thanks to a complete renovation of those rooms, the Botticelli’s glow as never before. In addition to the rooms dedicated to Sandro, Rooms 9 and 15 have been upgraded as well.

The rooms reopened on October 18, 2016 (yesterday).  For those of you headed to Florence anytime in the future will enjoy the spectacular way his unforgettable work is now showcased.

Enjoy!

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Primavera in the newly renovated rooms of Botticelli at the Uffizi

Uffizi Gallery

CLOSED MONDAYS!!

Tuesday – Sunday, 08:15AM – 06:50PM

Tickets: Uffizi Web Site

MAP OF BOTTICELLI ROOMS, UFFIZI

map-2nd-floor-2015-02

 

 

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Those of you fortunate enough to be in Italy this coming weekend, 24 and 25 September, can take advantage of extended museum hours and reduced museum entrance fees as part of the annual celebration of European Heritage.

The Florence Tourist Information Office has published a complete list of the museums and sites favorably affected by these special days. See below for a link to the document.

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Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

If you are at all interested in saving and seeing while in Florence, this is the weekend to do so! The link below is the official announcement, in Italian, for the special pricing and hours. The listing is in English and you can find information about hours and pricing.  .

giornate_europee_patrimonio_2016_english

ENJOY bella Firenze on two very important and special days.

If you would like to learn more about our small group explorations of Italy with four unique and distinct itineraries, please visit us at: www.private-italy.com

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Poster for the Exhibition

“Of Loves and Ladies, Knights and Arms, I sing, of Courtesies, and Many a daring feat…”

So begins the story.

Ludovico Ariosto (1474-1522) is a name well known within Italian literary culture. It was he who wrote the epic poem, Orlando Furioso, a continuation of Orlando Innamorata (unfinished, 1491) by Matteo Maria Boiardo.

Depicting a battle between Charlemagne and the King of Africa, Agramante. Ariosto’s final edition (he added five cantos to the first edition in 1521) is composed of forty-five cantos.

Written in Ferrara between 1510 and 1516, it is now considered to be among the masterpieces of western literature.

Thanks to the generous work of Project Gutenberg , we have immediate access to the poem: Orlando Furioso

The exhibit in Ferrara’s Palazzo dei Diamanti (a stunner of Renaissance architecture) also showcases the culture of the time. Artifacts from the period of Ariosto’s work, which began in 1506, along with art, armor, works of art and other renaissance treasures compliment the exhibit.

From the museum’s exhibit announcement: “…from Mantegna to Leonardo, from Raphael to Michelangelo to Titian—in addition to ancient and Renaissance sculptures, engravings, tapestries, weapons, books, and artifacts of extraordinary beauty and value, (we) will bring back to life Orlando Furioso’s fantastic world of knights and warriors…”

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Portrait of Ludovico Ariosto

The exhibit is receiving widespread and appropriately exceptional reviews. If you find yourself in Italy during the exhibit’s run, I strongly encourage you to go!

Ferrara is within an easy day’s train excursion from Venice (app. One Hour), Florence (One hour on the Freccia)  or Milan (app. two hours).

Orlando Furioso 500 years
What did Ariosto see when he closed his eyes

24 September 2016 – 8 January 2017

Opening hours

Daily, including Mondays and public holidays:
9am – 7 pm
(last ticket issued 30 min. before close)
Also open 1 November, 8, 25 and 26 December, 1 and 6 January

Admission

Audioguide included for individuals, whisper phones for groups
– Full: 13.00 Euros

– Reduced Ticket prices: 11.00 Euros (6 to 18 years, over 65, university students, members of associations with special agreements)

 

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Santa Maria Nuova Facade

As of December 15, 2015, those who seek an opportunity to discover an incredible collection of art in Florence now have a wonderful option: the Ospedale Santa Maria Nuova. This, the oldest hospital in Florence, now offers guided visits to some of is vast collection of treasures.

Arcispedale_di_santa_maria_nuova,_affreschi_di_antonio_pomarancio,_1614,_strage_degli_innocenti

Fresco by Antonio Pomarancio – 1614

The hospital was founded in 1288 by the father of Dante’s beloved Beatrice, Folco Portinari. He was asked to build the edifice after being approached by the matriarch of the founder’s family, Monna Tessa.

 

Over the centuries, donations have been made to the hospital in thanks for the care and service provided to various families.The rich variety of art  include works by Pietro di Niccolò Gerini, Andrea del Castagno, Della Robbia, Bernardo Buontalenti, and Pomarancio. Visits to this complex offer visitors rare glimpses of an invaluable, little-known, collection of renaissance treasures.

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Andrea del Castango, Crucifixion with Saints

Architecturally, the beauty of the structures, interior arches and various vast superb rooms with ceilings covered in frescoes, add yet another dimension to your visit.

Your visit to Santa Maria Nuova takes you through  many places of historical and artistic interest; the entrance to the area dedicated to Spedalinghi Hospital and the ” Hall of Crosses “, the cloisters of the ” Medicherie ” and ” Bones ” as well as the Church of Sant’Egidio , with its adjoining women’s gallery which once was the area reserved for nuns to attend religious services

In order to visit the Osepdale, you will need to contact them directly through the links below. Tours are organized with no more than twenty in a group, and are always lead by a guide so that the privacy of patients is observed and the size of groups well controlled.

To arrange your visit, here are details:

Address: Piazza Santa Maria Nuova, 1, 50122 Firenze, Italy

Visits last 40 to 50 minutes and groups can be no larger than 20. A professional guide always accompanies the group.

Reservation number, exclusively for these tours:  055 20.01.586
Tours are available to schedule from 9.00 – 13.00 / 14.00 – 18.00
Saturday, 9.00 – 13.00
Email: info@exclusiveconnection.it

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Catalog Cover Mandragola Press Pantormo e Rosso Fiorentino

Catalog Cover
Mandragora Press
Pantormo e Rosso Fiorentino

A few days ago I had the opportunity to visit an extraordinary exhibition at the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence. Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino, Diverging Paths of Mannerism, explores the development of mannerist painters who, born in same year, 1494, were trained under the guidance of Andrea del Sarto.

The exhibition, in addition to numerous canvases, shows work by all three artists by means of frescoes removed from walls and placed, with tremendous care, within the palazzo. The construction of the show permits visitors extraordinarily close up access to these masterworks.

The show highlights critically important paintings and frescoes. From Rosso’s hands are works such as San Paolo in Carcere/St. Paul in Prison and Morte di Cleopatra/The Death of Cleopatra. From Pontormo’s hand are works such as the Ritratto di Giovanetto/Portrait if a Young Man and what many consider to be his masterpiece, The Visitation (seen on the cover of the show’s catalog, above).

I left the palazzo very moved by the beauty of the work, the dedication shown by those responsible for mounting such an exhibit and most importantly stunned by the beauty of the work.

I will be posting further observations about the work, in particular, of Pontormo in a future post.

If you are in Florence this summer, and you are these before July 20, 2014, GO!

 

Palazzo Strozzi

Piazza Strozzi
50123 FIRENZE

Opening hours including holidays

Open daily 9.00 am – 8.00 pm
Thursdays 9.00 am -11.00 pm
Visitors admitted up to one hour before exhibition closes

Tickets; Euro 10.00 regular admission

Reduced admission is available for certain qualifying visitors

Reservations
Monday to Friday
9.00-13.00; 14.00-18.00
Tel. +39 055 2469600
Fax +39 055 244145
prenotazioni@palazzostrozzi.org

Pontormo-e-Rosso-Fiorentino-Palazzo-Strozzi-Firenze-10 Pontormo-e-Rosso-Fiorentino-Palazzo-Strozzi-Firenze-7 Pontormo-e-Rosso-Fiorentino-Palazzo-Strozzi-Firenze-2

 

 

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News that the Museo del Opera del Duomo (Museum of the Works of the Duomo) in Florence is closed for over a year for an expansive restoration has been met with mixed reviews. The new museum will nearly triple the old museum’s size and will include a full scale replica of the facade of Florence’s first Duomo, Santa Reparata. The North/South and East doors of the Baptistery – the original panels, that is – will also be placed on display in the new spaces of the museum for all to enjoy. Concurrently, the Baptistery exterior is undergoing extensive renovation, to include the replacement of all of the original door panels with copies.

It is  a bit sad, and disappointing to the thousands how will visit Florence over the next year,  to think that the Nicodemus Pieta, Donatello’s Magdalene and the Della Robbia – Donatello Choir lofts, along with numerous other treasures of Renaissance art,  will not be seen again until the fall of 2015 when the museum is scheduled to reopen. Architect Rendering Museum of the Works of the Duomo

There are, however,  numerous options for visitors to experience the art of the Renaissance in Florence; the Uffizi, the Bargello Museum, the Museo di Firenze com’era, and – until 20 July 2014 – an extraordinary exploration of the art of Rosso Fiorentino and Pontormo at the Palzzzo Strozzi. (More on that in another post).

So…if you wish to visit the treasures residing in the Museum of the Works of the Duomo, enjoy Florence this summer and come back in the fall of 2015 to celebrate what promises to be an incredible reopening.

Architectural Section
Museum of the Works of the Duomo – 2015

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Givovanni d"Ambrogio 15th Century Museum of the Works of the Duomo, Florence

Givovanni d’Ambrogio
15th Century
Museum of the Works of the Duomo, Florence

A recent incident with priceless art in Florence has me considering the easy access the world has to Florentine art.

While comparing his own hand to that of a 15th Century work by the Renaissance sculptor Giovanni d’Ambrogio, a visiting American surgeon broke one of the fingers off Ambrogio’s statue of the Virgin Mary. Tempers flared, threats made, waters calmed and the surgeon is, by this writing, on his way home or already home.

Hmmm . . .

What I have always shared with clients as we travel across Italy is that all of Italy is an open air museum. The temptation to touch a work of art is so strong, and the accessibility of those art works so open in museums, that such temptation proves too much for some.

In the Museum of the Works of the Duomo, only steps from where this American surgeon created such a stir, is Michelangelo’s Nicodemus Pieta, one of the last of the master’s works.

You can walk right up and, if you were so inclined, reach over a short railing and touch the master’s work.

This is not the first such incident with Florence’s art.

In August of 2005, a young Italian man under the substantial influence of alcohol accepted a bet from friends to climb the Fountain of Neptune (Amananti, 16th Century, called “biancone“) in the Piazza della Signoria. As he reached to pull himself up using Neptune’s left hand it came off. Video surveillance captured the incident and eventually the damage was paid for by the guilty party.

The Broken Finger

The Broken Finger

I feel badly for the surgeon that made this error, and at the same time am embarrassed about the incident.

Yes, there are many more important events occurring in our world these days. However, the attention that this incident has garnered underscores the commitment a civilized society places on its art.

Bottom line? When you are in museums anywhere, no less Florence, enjoy . . . but DON’T TOUCH!

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